Examining psychosocial factors in substance abuse among undergraduates of Ekiti state universities

Authors

  • Oluwakemi Elizabeth Omole
  • Taiwo Odueso
  • Ejiro Benita Ojirigho
  • Rukayat Yetunde Olaide

Keywords:

Loneliness, parental bonding, substance abuse, age, level of study

Abstract

A key problem around the globe is substance abuse and for years it has been influential in global mortality rates It has also contributed to the increased rate of anti-social activities among young people. This study investigated loneliness, parental bonding, age, level of study and gender in substance abuse among undergraduates of Ekiti State universities. The study adopted an ex-post facto research design, and three hundred and forty-six (346) undergraduates were accidentally sampled from three institutions in Ekiti State. The participants were administered with University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) loneliness scale, Parental bonding inventory, and Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST) together with demographic information. Four hypotheses were tested using independent t-test and multiple regressions. The result of the tested hypothesis showed that loneliness did not significantly influence substance abuse (t = 1.77; df = 344, p >.05). Parental bonding did not significantly influence substance abuse (t = -.349; df = 344, p >.05). Age and level of study jointly predicted substance abuse [F (2, 331) = 7.36; p<.01]. Gender did not significantly influence substance abuse (t = -.001; df = 344, p >.05). Based on these findings, it was concluded that loneliness, parental bonding and gender did not have any significant influence on substance abuse; while age and level of study jointly predicted substance abuse, with age having an independent significance. Based on the findings, it was recommended that age should be factored into the design and delivery of psychoeducation and drug abuse advocacy programmes.

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Published

2022-12-19